NZ tv

There aren't a lot of things on  NZ daytime tv that I actually enjoy but I do watch (or listen to while I do something else) some of the cooking competitions. I watch them mostly because I don't have to see what's going on to understand where things are headed.

Of course, there are ads for other food competitions on these programs and some of the trailers just make me roll my eyes to hear them.

One is 'Jr. Master Chef', a British show. First of all, as I have mentioned before, I can't see NZ kids being participants because real competition is not encouraged in the schools as far as I noticed. Everybody gets a reward. In fact, what we used to call 'graduation' in my day is aptly called 'prize giving' because--yes, you guessed it, everybody gets a prize, at least in the lower grades!

The other reason this show's trailers make me roll my eyes is one judge complimenting a contestant saying, 'That literally blew me away!' NO, IT DIDN'T! If it did, you would not still be standing there, you dipstick. Look up the word 'literally' in the dictionary.

When someone decides that a program should be mirrored in NZ, like 'My Kitchen Rules' or 'Come Dine with Me', it just doesn't translate well. I really do try to watch them and I try to like them, but it just doesn't work for me.
And so, the previews for the latest 'Come Dine with Me NZ' don't impress me either. See, as a kid, I was taught to always act civilized in public--look your best and use nice words, don't argue without good cause. No, that's not being a hypocrite, it's being respectful and a good representative of the family name. It seems that the NZ contestants have been raised differently because they act less than mature on national television with name-calling and bad manners.

Hubby thinks these shows are all manipulated to put people together who are guaranteed not to get along, thus making for 'good tv'. He might be right when it comes to NZtv. The Aussie and British versions, of course, have clashing personalities but nothing like the NZ shows.

Then there is the NZ version of 'The Great British Bake Off' that I heard advertised. One female judge said, 'That's the worst thing I've ever tasted!' Granted, as a judge, she should let her opinion be known, but it's not very professional for her to be that rude, even if it tastes like dirt.

Whatever happened to dignity and respectability?

Maybe I'm just getting old but I think that some words and actions should never leave the confines of your home--especially, if it would make your mother blush.

a tisket a tasket...

We went to the Hospice Op Shop [short for 'opportunity', NZ for thrift shop] yesterday and I found this great basket for my puzzle books.  Grace had other plans.


my learning curve in gardening

The weather has blooming times jumbled at my house. This camellia--named 'Frodo the Rhodo who's really a camellia' by my LOTR fan bestie (don't ask!)--isn't suppose to bloom until October some time. 

Like lots of other plants in the garden, the warm weather after a slight dip of temperature has, apparently, convinced it that it's spring already.


As I have mentioned before, I'm quite a literal person. So when I bought some hyacinth bulbs, I planted them according to the directions 'in autumn'. Well, the calendar said autumn, but I have since learned that bulbs can't read.

It wasn't cold enough for them to know winter was still on the way and they poked their little heads up soon after planting. *sigh* I do hope they will be willing to bloom again next spring.


taranaki countryside

I have lived in some rural places in my life. A couple of them were on dirt roads, which is understandable when there are just a few houses in the area. There was even a dirt road that was a shortcut to work (it probably had a name, but I never knew it) when I lived in Kansas, so I'm used to dirt roads.

The thing that I'm not used to--and that still makes me giggle on occasion--is the fact that the paved roads in the outlying areas sometimes just turn into dirt and gravel. I imagine the crew paving the road using up all the asphalt and just saying, 'She'll be right,' and going home.

We went down one of those today when I left the directions at the house and we were just winging it, looking around the countryside. [I do have to add that Hubby remembered most of the directions he had written down. Thank you, Hubby!]

We started and ended with a street sign naming the road we were on, but in the middle--as we went up and over a saddle (NZ word for a mountain pass)--the pavement turned to gravel and dirt. It was obviously the 'road less taken' because the sheep ran away from the car as we rode by. After we started down the other side, the asphalt reappeared like magic.

I really enjoy these rides that have no particular objective except to see the countryside around us. The hills are amazing to me and I never tire of seeing sights like this:




I'm definitely not in Kansas anymore